EPISODE 443 – Geocaching Creepy-Crawly, Itchy-Scratchy

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Sponsored by: Cache-Advance.com

Mar 16, 2016

In tonight’s episode of the Geocaching Podcast:
It’s Spring regardless what the calendar date says in many parts of the world and that means keeping an eye out for those things that can bring harm to a geocacher if they are not careful. Go over some of the basics with the guys in tonight’s episode.

Be sure to check it out! Please share with other geocachers.

We meet on Wednesday nights at 9:30PM ET at http://www.geocachingpodcast.com/live so you can see us record the show live and join in the chat room. See you there!
#geocaching #geocachingpodcast #headhardhat #podcast

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The Video Version of our Podcast

EPISODE 443 – Geocaching Creepy-Crawly, Itchy-Scratchy

HeadHardHat’s Blog
Geocaching Question – Is It Poison Ivy Or Isn’t It?
http://headhardhat-geocache.blogspot.com/2015/02/geocaching-question-is-it-poison-ivy-or.html

Jamie Davis – The PodMedic from Episode 23 – Poison Ivy Discussion – (Three Minutes)

Native and Naturalized Plants of The Carolinas and Georgia
Name That Plant
http://www.namethatplant.net/gallery_comparison.shtml?compare=leaves%20of%20Poison%20Ivy%20and%20others%20confused%20with%20it

Other Plants of Concern

Wood Nettle/Stinging Nettles
http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html

Stinging, or wood nettle plants feature triangular or heart-shaped leaves that decrease in size as they go up the slender stem. The leaves are one to six centimeters long and one to four centimeters wide with linear bumps, and the plant typically is three feet to six-and-a-half feet tall. Singing nettles also include green flower clusters and brown seed-like fruit. Most notably, the plant has stinging hairs.
When these stinging hairs come into contact with skin, they break the skin and release an irritant that causes redness and severe itching. These symptoms are typically brief but can be quite uncomfortable. Hikers who come into contact with stinging nettles should wash the affected area with soap and water. Creating a paste of water and baking soda can also alleviate the itching and irritation.

Using tape to pull out the microscopic stingers helps too. Duct tape is for more than camouflaging and cache retrieval.

Giant Hogweed
http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/39809.html

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Venomous Snakes and Spiders

Venomous Snakes

Copperhead
Cottonmouth
Pigmy Rattler
Canebrake
Diamondback
Coral snake
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Venomous Spiders
Black Widows
Brown Recluse

By State:
http://www.venombyte.com/venom/spiders/venomous_spiders_by_state.asp

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Scorpions:
By State:
http://www.venombyte.com/venom/scorpions/venomous_scorpions_by_state.asp

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Alligators and Crocodiles:
Careful They Bite!
Living with gators and crocs guides
http://myfwc.com/conservation/you-conserve/wildlife/gators/

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